Art of Woman

Christmas

I went to church on Christmas Day and saw a delightful video clip. Our church, Mosaic Baptist, Belconnen, often puts on dramas, interesting clips and info gathered from Christians from around the world. I attend a vibrant, active church that engages with modern technology.

The clip is an entertaining interpretation of the Christmas story from the angels’ point of view acted by some very cute children. There were some poignant comments that illuminate both the fragility of the Christ child and the enormity of the salvation message. I was amused by the gun-ho attitude of the boys who wanted to bring Christ to earth with an almighty army to conquer the world. The girls came up with some practical questions of where He will live and who will be welcoming Him. God shocked both the boys and girls by choosing a peasant girl to give birth in a stable! One angel showed impeccable logic and asks “What if they don’t notice?”. God’s answer is worth listening to carefully. All the angels were horrified that Christ was being born with animals! and hay! and POO! The look of disgust when they said “Poo!” was classic.

Christ was born physically in the same way that we all are, as a helpless baby born through the vagina of a woman, then suckling at her breasts. We can take joy in the physicality of our bodies whatever shape we are in - God certainly affirms the importance of our bodies. We are all fragile lumps of vulnerable flesh in a harsh, difficult and even hostile world. Christ’s humble natal family show us that we can all be agents of God regardless of our status in society. Christ’s example shows us that we all have the capacity to have an intimate relationship with God creator. Being rich and privileged does not give any advantage with God. Christ became one of us with a vulnerable physical body. He needed to eat, drink, have warm clothes and shelter, just like all of us.

And he died - just like all of us will.

The production was made by St Pauls in Auckland, New Zealand.
View on youtube: “An Unexpected Christmas

Christmas Greetings

Christmas is a time to give all people on earth good wishes and encouraging thoughts.

Again we consider the Christ child, the incarnation of God. In this child we see the wonder of God’s creativity and compassion combined. We see God becoming human, experiencing all the joys, excitement and wonder of a human body as well as the irritations, limitations, frustrations, pain and emotions of living in a physical body. This experience sanctifies all our bodies. God truly knows what it is like to be us! And God has compassion for our troubles and experiences.

God coming to earth as a baby makes parenthood a sacred calling. Unfortunately, despite a rhetoric of equality, mothers still do most of the organising and physical work of child rearing. This results in fewer hours available for their careers, so mothers take a career hit when they have children. Employers say they support families while at the same time implying that reduced hours means a lack of commitment.
(http://www.bnet.com/blog/business-strategy/women-still-pay-a-big-price-for-motherhood/981).

It is hard for mothers to feel respected when their careers crash or are blocked and the skills of mothering are disregarded in the workplace.

I am in awe of how wonderfully the human body is made. I aim to articulate the magnificent way that God made the human body through my art. The more I learn about the intricacies of how we are made the more I respect God’s creation and the more motivated I am to articulate that respect in my art. Looking forward to a productive year.

“You made all the delicate parts of my body and knit them together in my mother’s womb. Thank you for making me so wonderfully complex!” Psalm 139:13-14 Living Bible.

Christmas is also a time to re-connect with family and loved ones. We have time off work to celebrate Christmas and this gives us time to reflect on other aspects of life. It is not good to be tied exclusively to the working world and risk neglecting friends, family and other connections. It was a great joy to us that modern technology enabled us to see our son who is living overseas. May you all have enjoyable times with your friends and family over the holiday break.

Wishing you all the strength and resources to fulfil your aims and goals in the New Year.

A Christmas Message: "Immanuel - God with us"

At Christmas we give gifts and spend time with our family and friends wishing good will to all. Christmas is the celebration of the Christ child – Immanuel – God with us, Matthew 1:23.

photo copyright Margaret Kalms

To all the new parents I ask you to remember the moment you first saw your new baby. Remember the sense of awe and excitement of a new human in the world. I certainly felt it when each of my children were born. Despite my biological training and sex education, I still asked in wonder ‘Where did you come from?’ It was a spiritual question, not a biological one. I knew the practicalities of creation but the practicalities did not prepare me for the force of emotions that overwhelmed me when I first looked into the eyes of each new child. This emotion is spiritual, full of hope and joy. I photographed newborn babies for several years in Canberra’s hospitals and I never tired of the awe of holding and looking at a newborn baby. As I said in ‘Passages Through Parenthood: real life stories from Australian parents’ (Anne Godfrey. Lothian books 2000)

I still feel a sense of wonder when I hold a newborn baby. Each baby represents another try at life, another chance to explore what it is to be human. Maybe this baby will make fewer mistakes than I, achieve greater things, inspire or help more people. Each new baby brings hope. We can look into a baby’s face and imagine any future. They help us to think of and plan for the future because it will be twenty years before they are full members of the community. Babies give us a continuum of life that is difficult to describe, a sense of history, a sense of generation following generation and of time flowing on. Who of us has not marvelled at those beautiful tiny fingers and toes of a newborn and not wondered at the sheer mystery of life. When we grasp how much of a miracle birth is, we also know that life is precious.



This experience is one aspect of Immanuel – God with us. God came to earth as a human to experience ALL of our emotions and to share the experience of our lives and to live in perfect harmony with God. In doing so in a mysterious and miraculous way He reconciled God and humanity.

As a Christian I am asked to see Immanuel – God with us in everybody. As a human it is relatively easy to see Immanuel – God with us in our friends and family, those whose company we enjoy. It is harder to see Immanuel – God with us in people we do not like, people who have betrayed or hurt us, people who are cruel or violent, or people who look, dress and smell differently from us. Christmas is a time to remember all our fellow humans to see the miracle of creation in every person, to see the mark of God within no matter what their life situation, to look beyond our personal preferences. Our church reaches out to many during the Christmas season by giving food hampers to local people, hosting community events, giving Christmas shoe-boxes as presents to children and by sending any money offerings gathered on Christmas Day to Baptist World Aid for suffering people around the world.

Last night we received a call that our son had a ‘bad landing’ when he went para-gliding. He is in a country hospital recovering from his injuries 50km from home. This is a dread that any parent fears. Of course we drove to the hospital immediately. It was a sombre mood during the drive to the hospital in the dark last night. We wondered exactly how injured our son was and how it may affect his young life in the future. I am reminded of the fragility of life, how quickly circumstances can change. Although our son’s life is not in immediate danger, this fall has reminded us of the possibility of death. Another reason to see Immanuel – God with us in all of us, is that life can be taken from us at any time. In the developed countries like Australia where I live, it is easy to forget the fragility of life. We know life expectancy is around 80 years so we expect everyone to live ‘til their 80s. We have a tendency to take each other for granted, to take life for granted. But death happens at all ages, even in Australia. Life is a gift to be treasured. But not held on to. I still do not want to wrap my children in ‘cotton-wool’. I’m glad they are doing exciting things and I will not restrict their adventures. I know they are learning from experienced trainers who will teach safety issues. I hope that when my time comes to die, I will be doing something exciting or something worthwhile, because we ALL die.

I wish you all a Happy New Year bringing you many blessings, that God is with YOU and that you achieve good things and grow closer to your life purpose.